Classical architecture has always been a source of inspiration. Architects of public buildings and important institutions display this type of style in their neoclassical designs.
However, the original classic structures exemplify the greatness and fortitude of that era. The Top 10 Most Famous Classic Architecture you should visit are:


Top 10 Most Famous Classic Architecture You Should Visit

1. Colosseum

 

The Colosseum was originally known as the Flavian Amphitheatre. Furthermore, it was built 70–80 A.D. and could accommodate 60,000 seated people and 10,000 standing individuals. However, there are 80 entrances. Furthermore, it is the largest amphitheater ever built and it is considered one of the greatest works of architecture and engineering.


2. Parthenon

 

The Parthenon was construct between 447-432 BCE to be the focus of the Acropolis building complex. However, the Parthenon is a temple of the Doric order with eight columns at the façade, and seventeen columns at the flanks.

The temple’s main function was to shelter the monumental statue of Athena. All temples in Greece were designed to be seen only from the outside. Furthermore, the viewers did not enter the temple and could only glance at the interior statues through the open doors.


3. Temple of Apollo

 

The Temple of Apollo in Corinth Greece, has been date to around 540 BC. It was built to replace an earlier temple. The temple was built in the Doric style. It had 6 columns at each end, and 15 along each side. Furthermore, it was 53m (174 feet) long and 21m (70 feet) wide.

The Doric columns are made from single pieces of stone. The stone use was limestone, and had a surface of white marble stucco apply to it. It is documented that the Greek traveler and geographer Pausanias who may have written his descriptions between 155 and 180 AD, recorded that there was a bronze statue of Apollo in the Temple.


4. The Temple of Hera

View of Hera II

 

The Temple is located about fifty-five miles south of Naples, Italy, in the ancient city of Paestum.

The Temple of Hera was one of the oldest buildings in the site of Olympia. After the first games had been organize in 776 BC, they gradually became more important throughout the Greek world.

Months before the commencement of the Olympic Games, the Olympic torch is ignite. The flame begins its journey at Olympia, Greece at the site of the original Olympic Games. It done as it was in ancient times, at the Temple of Hera.


5. Pantheon

pantheon

 

The Pantheon is a building in Rome, Italy. The Pantheon is devoted to the worship of every god. “Pan” means every, and “Theon” refers to divinity. The Pantheon was built by the Emperor Hadrian between 118 and 125 A.D.
Statesman and General Marcus Agrippa was responsible for the construction of the original church and the inscription can be seen over the portico.
In 609, it was converted into a Christian Church by Pope Boniface IV and consecrated to Santa Maria of the Martyrs. Around 1870 it was converted into a memorial chapel for the kings of Italy. The tombs of Vittorio Emanuele II, Umberto I and Margherita of Savoy are there, as well as the celebrate Renaissance Artist Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino, who is more often referre to as simply Raphael.

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6. The Propylaea

propylaea

 

The Propylaea is the historic gateway of the Acropolis in Athens. It was designed by the architect Mnesikles and constructed in 437-432 B.C.

There is a central building and two lateral wings. The colonnades along the west and east sides had a row of Doric columns while two rows of Ionic columns divided the central corridor into three parts. The walls of the north wing were decorated with painted panels or wall paintings.


7. Maison Carrée

maison carree

 

Maison Carrée is one of the best-preserved temples of the Roman Empire and it is in Nîmes, southern France. It was commissioned by Marcus Agrippa and opened around 16 – 20 B.C.

It was so influential during the Classical Revival, that it inspired many monumental buildings such Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia State Capitol in 1788 and La Madeleine located in Paris in 1806. However, it was built of local limestone by architects from Rome.

It is elevated on a tall podium nearly 10 feet high and approached by a monumental flight of stairs on the west end. Despite the temple’s French name, which means “Square House,” the building is rectangular and has a single portico on the west side, comprising of six 33-feet high Corinthian columns.


8. Erechtheion

erechtheion

 

The Parthenon was the most notable temple on the Acropolis. The Erechtheion was another building that was created to accommodate the religious rituals that the old temple housed.

Construction of the Erechtheion began and was concluded around 406 B.C.

The temple faces east and its entrance is lined with six long Ionic columns. To the north and west the wall of the temple drops dramatically to almost twice the altitude of the front and south side’s.

The temple includes two porches; one at the northwest corner which is supported by tall Ionic columns, and one at the south-west corner which is supported by six massive female statues, the famous Caryatids.


9. Hephaisteion

 

The Hephaisteion also known as the Temple of Hephaistos is located at the top of the hill of the Agora. It was dedicat to Hephaistos god of furnace and Athena goddess of arts and craft. The construction started around 460-450 BCE.

In ancient times, many artisans lived in the vicinity. Furthermore, the temple is almost entirely made of Pentelic marble. However, the base is made of limestone. Furthermore, it has 34 columns; 6 each in the front and rear, and 13 each side. In the seventh century, the temple was convert in to the church of St. Georgios.


10. The Temple of Vesta

 

The Temple of Vesta is a Roman temple in Tivoli, Italy that can be trace to the early 1st century B.C. Furthermore, its ruins sit on the acropolis of the city, overlooking the falls of the Aniene. However, the “Temple of Vesta” has been a source of inspiration for architects in various parts of the world, varying from building designs to landscaped gardens. Furthermore, this design was reproduce in England with the “Temple of Ancient Virtue”; “Mussenden Temple” in Ireland and the “Temple of the Sibyl” in Poland.